Potter Wasps

Pot

Pot

Potter Wasp

Potter Wasp

It didn’t take us long to connect the presence of a funny shaped wasp, with an extremely thin section between the chest and abdomen, and the clay pots that started to appear around the house. Maggie was even splattered by a wasp with clay as were the windows which they collided with from time to time. The name “potter wasp” seems a lot more descriptive than Vespidae Eumenidae.

They make an irritating sound when they enter stereo speakers to build nests and so it is not difficult to find them, although removing the “pots” can prove to be less simple. When a cell is completed the wasp collects live food such as caterpillars and, after first paralysing them, places them in the cell as food for a single wasp larva. When the larva hatches it feeds on the spiders for a few weeks before changing into the adult wasp. The complete life cycle lasts from a few weeks to, in some cases, more than a year from the egg until the adult emerges. Adult potter wasps feed on nectar.

Control of these insects is unnecessary as potter wasps rarely sting and are beneficial in getting rid of unwanted caterpillars and other insects. Removal of mud nests is best done when holes appear in the mud (indicating the wasps have emerged).

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